Apr
7
Tue
Full Moon (19:35 MST).
Apr 7 all-day

Full Moon. Rises at sunset, high in the sky around midnight. Visible all night.

Moon overview on solarsystem.nasa.gov

Moon at Perigee (11:08 MST)
Apr 7 all-day
Apr
20
Mon
Moon at Apogee (12:01 MST).
Apr 20 all-day
Apr
21
Tue
Lyrids Meteor Shower
Apr 21 all-day

Lyrids Meteor Shower

Next period of activity: April 16th, 2020 to April 30th, 2020

Peak: Apr 21-22, 2020 – the moon will be 92% illuminated.

The Lyrids are a medium strength shower that usually produces good rates for three nights centered on the maximum. These meteors also usually lack persistent trains but can produce fireballs. These meteors are best seen from the northern hemisphere where the radiant is high in the sky at dawn. Activity from this shower can be seen from the southern hemisphere, but at a lower rate.

Shower details – Radiant: 18:04 +34° – ZHR: 18 – Velocity: 30 miles/sec (medium – 48.4km/sec) – Parent Object: C/1861 G1 (Thatcher)

Data from the American Meteor Society.

Interactive animation from MeteorShowers.org.

Apr
22
Wed
New Moon (19:26 MST).
Apr 22 all-day

New Moon

By the modern definition, New Moon occurs when the Moon and Sun are at the same geocentric ecliptic longitude. The part of the Moon facing us is completely in shadow then. Pictured here is the traditional New Moon, the earliest visible waxing crescent, which signals the start of a new month in many lunar and lunisolar calendars.

Moon overview on solarsystem.nasa.gov

Apr
24
Fri
Space Shuttle Discovery launched with Hubble space telescope, 1990.
Apr 24 all-day
Apr
26
Sun
Uranus in Conjunction with Sun.
Apr 26 all-day
May
4
Mon
Eta-Aquariid Meteor Shower.
May 4 all-day

Eta-Aquariids Meteor Shower

Next period of activity: April 19th, 2020 to May 28th, 2020

Peak: May 5-6, 2020 – the moon will be 1% illuminated.

The Eta Aquariids are a strong shower when viewed from the southern tropics. From the equator northward, they usually only produce medium rates of 10-30 per hour just before dawn. Activity is good for a week centered the night of maximum activity. These are swift meteors that produce a high percentage of persistent trains, but few fireballs.

Shower details – Radiant: 22:32 -1° – ZHR: 40 – Velocity: 42 miles/sec (swift – 66.9km/sec) – Parent Object: 1P/Halley

Data from the American Meteor Society.

Interactive animation from MeteorShowers.org.

Mercury at Superior Conjunction.
May 4 all-day