Jan
22
Wed
Jupiter 0.4° North of the Moon (19:42 MST)
Jan 22 all-day
Jan
24
Fri
New Moon (14:42 MST)
Jan 24 all-day

New Moon

By the modern definition, New Moon occurs when the Moon and Sun are at the same geocentric ecliptic longitude. The part of the Moon facing us is completely in shadow then. Pictured here is the traditional New Moon, the earliest visible waxing crescent, which signals the start of a new month in many lunar and lunisolar calendars.

Moon overview on solarsystem.nasa.gov

Jan
28
Tue
Moon at Apogee (14:28 MST)
Jan 28 all-day
Feb
9
Sun
Full Moon (00:33 MST).
Feb 9 all-day

Full Moon. Rises at sunset, high in the sky around midnight. Visible all night.

Moon overview on solarsystem.nasa.gov

Feb
10
Mon
Mercury at Greatest Elongation.
Feb 10 all-day
Mercury

This colorful view of Mercury was produced by using images from the color base map imaging campaign during MESSENGER’s primary mission. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Moon at Perigee (13:31 MST).
Feb 10 all-day
Feb
11
Tue
Mercury at Perihelion.
Feb 11 all-day

The young rays of Mena crater on Mercury contrast brightly against the surrounding surface, though the rays will gradually fade with time. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Feb
15
Sat
Anniversary of the 2013 Chelyabinsk Asteroid Impact Event
Feb 15 all-day

On February 15 2013 an asteroid exploded in the sky over the city of Chelyabinsk, in the the southern Ural region of Russia. The shock wave blew out windows all over the city, injuring over 1600 people, and damaged several buildings.

This event could well be the tipping point in public awareness about asteroids; a year after the event, the B612 Foundation and hundreds of scientists, engineers, entertainers, astronauts, astronomers, politicians, citizen activists and others got involved in what has turned into the global AsteroidDay campaign.

Each year, on the anniversary of the Tunguska Impact, events are held around the world to raise awareness of asteroids: their potential for space-side exploitation, planet-side destruction, and impact mitigation.

See also: #AsteroidDay

Feb
18
Tue
Mars at 0.8°S of Moon.
Feb 18 all-day

Conjunction of Mars and the Moon – Feb. 18, 2020. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley

Feb
19
Wed
Jupiter at 0.9°N of Moon (12:36 MST).
Feb 19 all-day

Conjunction of Jupiter and the Moon – Feb. 19, 2020. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley