Sep
22
Sat
Adventures of a Vatican Scientist @ Beckman Institute Auditorium
Sep 22 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

What does a scientist’s work represent: objectivity, intuition or another all-too-human foible? Both a Jesuit brother and a planetary scientist, Br. Guy Consolmagno, the director of the Vatican Observatory, explores the connections between meteorites, asteroids, and the evolution of small solar system bodies, while purposefully reflects on the human dimension of his scientific work. His research and Vatican affiliation have sent him around the world several times to dozens of countries and every continent (including a meteorite hunting expedition to Antarctica). In this talk, he will share some of those adventures, and reflect on the larger meaning of our common experience as scientists… not only what we do, but why we do it.

The event will begin with the talk by Br Consolmagno followed by an extended Q/A session with the audience. Light refreshment will be provided after the program.

PDF Flier: [Link]

Sep
23
Sun
Why Does the Vatican Have an Observatory? @ Holy Family Church - Connolly Parish Hall
Sep 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

The roots of the Vatican Observatory, one of the oldest astronomical institutions in the world, go back to the Gregorian Reform of the Calendar in 1582, and it has been part of an extensive history of Church support for astronomy (Galileo to the contrary!). Its very existence demonstrates that there is no inherent conflict between religion and science.

Brother Guy Consolmagno, Director of the Vatican Observatory, will share with us the observatory, including a summary of what’s being done there today!
Holy Family Church

Sep
27
Thu
Adventures of a Vatican Astronomer @ St. Meinrad Seminary
Sep 27 – Sep 28 all-day
Oct
5
Fri
Big Questions in Astronomy
Oct 5 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Oct
6
Sat
Big Questions in Astronomy @ Propsteiweg 1 9121 Tainach
Oct 6 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Oct
9
Tue
Why Do We Look Up at the Heavens?
Oct 9 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Why did we go to the Moon? Why does the Vatican support an astronomical observatory? These questions mask a deeper question: why do individuals choose to spend their lives in pursuit of pure knowledge? The motivation behind our choices, both as individuals and as a society, controls the sorts of science that gets done. It determines the kinds of answers that are found to be satisfying. And ultimately, it affects the way in which we think of ourselves.

Feb
15
Fri
Anniversary of the 2013 Chelyabinsk Impact Event
Feb 15 all-day

On February 15 2013 an asteroid exploded in the sky over the city of Chelyabinsk, in the the southern Ural region of Russia. The shock wave blew out windows all over the city, injuring over 1600 people, and damaged several buildings.

This event could well be the tipping point in public awareness about asteroids; a year after the event, the B612 Foundation and hundreds of scientists, engineers, entertainers, astronauts, astronomers, politicians, citizen activists and others got involved in what has turned into the global AsteroidDay campaign.

Each year, on the anniversary of the Tunguska Impact, events are held around the world to raise awareness of asteroids: their potential for space-side exploitation, planet-side destruction, and impact mitigation.

See also: #AsteroidDay

Feb
26
Tue
University of Kentucky @ Catholic Newman Center
Feb 26 all-day

sroberts@cdlex.org

Feb
27
Wed
University of Dayton
Feb 27 all-day
Mar
14
Thu
Yale Club of Southern Arizona
Mar 14 all-day