Faith and Science http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science Articles, videos, audio, and resources supporting Faith and Science Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:54:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 Hunting for Supernova: Why is Humanity Wired to Explore? http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/hunting-supernova-humanity-wired-explore/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:54:22 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4379 Article (blog post) 1100 words General audiences Fr. James Kurzynski writes on The Catholic Astronomer blog about his participation as an amateur astronomer in “citizen science”, and his hopes of discovering a supernova in another galaxy.  Fr. Kurzynski writes: I would invite you to prayerfully reflect upon this question: What are the things God has inspired you to explore? Whether your desire is to understand the world we live in and/or explore questions of meaning and purpose, realize that both types of questions ultimately point to a common origin. Our exploration of this world and our lives prepares us for life’s final exploration in which we will pass through the womb of death from this life to the next. It is through this journey that we will discover the answer to one of the most fundamental questions of life: Who am I in God’s eyes? May all of us discover today the beginnings of the answer to this question that affirms that all of Continue reading →

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 1100 words
  • General audiences
  • Fr. James Kurzynski writes on The Catholic Astronomer blog about his participation as an amateur astronomer in “citizen science”, and his hopes of discovering a supernova in another galaxy.  Fr. Kurzynski writes:

    I would invite you to prayerfully reflect upon this question: What are the things God has inspired you to explore? Whether your desire is to understand the world we live in and/or explore questions of meaning and purpose, realize that both types of questions ultimately point to a common origin. Our exploration of this world and our lives prepares us for life’s final exploration in which we will pass through the womb of death from this life to the next. It is through this journey that we will discover the answer to one of the most fundamental questions of life: Who am I in God’s eyes? May all of us discover today the beginnings of the answer to this question that affirms that all of us, to quote Pope Francis, are sinners who have been looked upon by God with love and mercy.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    Priests of Creation: Reclaiming Biblical Ecology through Maximus the Confessor http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/priests-creation-reclaiming-biblical-ecology-maximus-confessor/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:39:31 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4376 Article (blog post) 1800 words General audiences A post on The Catholic Astronomer blog by Fr. James Kurzynski about Saint Maximus the Confessor (580-662 A.D.) and his views on the created world.  Fr. Kurzynski writes: For Maximus, an anthropocentrism that views the human person as the center of creation is at the heart of Original Sin and the radical obsession of self that sin creates is the cause of an anthropocentric worldview. Therefore, to view creation in a way that exploits nature for personal gain is not an expression of authentic Christianity for Maximus, but is an embrace of the sinful disposition of heart that led to the Fall in the first place. Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.  

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 1800 words
  • General audiences
  • A post on The Catholic Astronomer blog by Fr. James Kurzynski about Saint Maximus the Confessor (580-662 A.D.) and his views on the created world.  Fr. Kurzynski writes:

    For Maximus, an anthropocentrism that views the human person as the center of creation is at the heart of Original Sin and the radical obsession of self that sin creates is the cause of an anthropocentric worldview. Therefore, to view creation in a way that exploits nature for personal gain is not an expression of authentic Christianity for Maximus, but is an embrace of the sinful disposition of heart that led to the Fall in the first place.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    Astronomy and Mother Teresa’s Shoes: Relics of the Sacred http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/astronomy-mother-teresas-shoes-relics-sacred/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:18:46 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4372 Article (blog post) 1100 words General audiences A post on The Catholic Astronomer by Fr. James Kurzynski about Mother Teresa and the idea of “relics”.  Fr. Kurzynski writes: As we approach the Canonization of Mother Teresa, let us thank God for the gift she was to the Church and continues to be through her ongoing intercession. Let us give thanks for the wisdom of the Church to value those sacred object, those relics that allow us a connection with the lives of the saints and inspire us to become the people that God calls us to be. And may we also look to the heavens for a different kind of “relic” in the night sky. These relics may not play a central role in our salvation. However, they remind us that without their existence, we would not exist. And for this reason, we can thank God for providing us these sacred reminders of our sacred beginnings, inspiring us to embrace a Continue reading →

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 1100 words
  • General audiences
  • A post on The Catholic Astronomer by Fr. James Kurzynski about Mother Teresa and the idea of “relics”.  Fr. Kurzynski writes:

    As we approach the Canonization of Mother Teresa, let us thank God for the gift she was to the Church and continues to be through her ongoing intercession. Let us give thanks for the wisdom of the Church to value those sacred object, those relics that allow us a connection with the lives of the saints and inspire us to become the people that God calls us to be. And may we also look to the heavens for a different kind of “relic” in the night sky. These relics may not play a central role in our salvation. However, they remind us that without their existence, we would not exist. And for this reason, we can thank God for providing us these sacred reminders of our sacred beginnings, inspiring us to embrace a saintly life. A life like Mother Teresa of Calcutta.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    One Comment by St. Albert the Great becomes a whole Blog Post http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/one-comment-st-albert-great-becomes-whole-blog-post/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:10:05 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4367 Article (blog post) 1300 words General audiences A post on The Catholic Astronomer about St. Albert the Great and his thoughts on the nature of the universe of stars. Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.  

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 1300 words
  • General audiences
  • A post on The Catholic Astronomer about St. Albert the Great and his thoughts on the nature of the universe of stars.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    Opposition to Galileo was scientific, not just religious http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/opposition-galileo-scientific-not-just-religious/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 14:54:28 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4360 Article 1000 words General audiences This article by Christopher Graney was originally published by Aeon, and later republished by The Atlantic and others. It discusses astronomical work published in 1614 by Johann Georg Locher, a student of the Jesuit astronomer Christoph Scheiner. There is a great contrast between how Galileo portrayed Locher’s work, and the work itself. Graney writes, “Locher matters. Science’s history matters. Anti-Copernicans such as Locher and Brahe show that science has always functioned as a contest of ideas, and that science was present in both sides of the vigorous debate over Earth’s motion.” Click here for this article from Aeon. Click here for this article from The Atlantic.  

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  • Article
  • 1000 words
  • General audiences
  • This article by Christopher Graney was originally published by Aeon, and later republished by The Atlantic and others. It discusses astronomical work published in 1614 by Johann Georg Locher, a student of the Jesuit astronomer Christoph Scheiner. There is a great contrast between how Galileo portrayed Locher’s work, and the work itself. Graney writes, “Locher matters. Science’s history matters. Anti-Copernicans such as Locher and Brahe show that science has always functioned as a contest of ideas, and that science was present in both sides of the vigorous debate over Earth’s motion.”

    Click here for this article from Aeon.

    Click here for this article from The Atlantic.

     

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    God is dead; long live the eternal God http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/god-dead-long-live-eternal-god/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 14:33:48 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4357 Article (blog post) 1200 words General audiences A post on The Catholic Astronomer blog by Vatican Observatory astronomer Br. Guy Consolmagno, S. J., commenting on Stephen Hawking’s ideas regarding God: Hawking does us an important favor by eliminating [a certain] image of God. The “god” that Stephen Hawking doesn’t believe in is one I don’t believe in either. God is not a force to be invoked to swell a progress, start a scene or two, and fill the momentary gaps in our knowledge. God is the reason why existence itself exists. God is the reason why space and time and the laws of nature can be present for the forces to operate that Stephen Hawking is talking about. What’s more, I believe in such a God not because of the absence of any other explanation for the origin of the universe, but because of the person of Jesus Christ — in history, in scripture, and in my own personal life Continue reading →

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 1200 words
  • General audiences
  • A post on The Catholic Astronomer blog by Vatican Observatory astronomer Br. Guy Consolmagno, S. J., commenting on Stephen Hawking’s ideas regarding God:

    Hawking does us an important favor by eliminating [a certain] image of God. The “god” that Stephen Hawking doesn’t believe in is one I don’t believe in either. God is not a force to be invoked to swell a progress, start a scene or two, and fill the momentary gaps in our knowledge.

    God is the reason why existence itself exists. God is the reason why space and time and the laws of nature can be present for the forces to operate that Stephen Hawking is talking about.

    What’s more, I believe in such a God not because of the absence of any other explanation for the origin of the universe, but because of the person of Jesus Christ — in history, in scripture, and in my own personal life of prayer. And even more strongly, I have faith in this God not merely because the universe exists, but because it is beautiful and fun to play in… that play we call science.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    Across the Universe: Stellar Round Up http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/stellar-round-up/ Mon, 14 Aug 2017 20:18:00 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4353 Article (blog post) 600 words General audiences A post by Vatican Observatory astronomer Br. Guy Consolmagno, S. J., on The Catholic Astronomer blog. Br. Consolmagno writes about knowing the science of astronomy versus knowing the night sky, and about knowing theology versus knowing God: “Look, along the ecliptic, directly opposite the point where the Sun lies; around midnight, you can see sunlight reflected back to us from the dust of the asteroid belt,” one friend pointed out to me. “It’s called the googenshine!” Actually, that’s gegenschein; but I didn’t correct him. I had studied it in graduate school; I knew how to spell it, and what the German words mean. But unlike my friend, I had never actually seen it before. A lot of professional astronomers never look at the night sky; some of them don’t even know how to find the most basic constellations. Even those of us who came to our professional calling from a teen-aged enthusiasm with small telescopes now Continue reading →

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 600 words
  • General audiences
  • A post by Vatican Observatory astronomer Br. Guy Consolmagno, S. J., on The Catholic Astronomer blog. Br. Consolmagno writes about knowing the science of astronomy versus knowing the night sky, and about knowing theology versus knowing God:

    “Look, along the ecliptic, directly opposite the point where the Sun lies; around midnight, you can see sunlight reflected back to us from the dust of the asteroid belt,” one friend pointed out to me. “It’s called the googenshine!” Actually, that’s gegenschein; but I didn’t correct him. I had studied it in graduate school; I knew how to spell it, and what the German words mean. But unlike my friend, I had never actually seen it before.

    A lot of professional astronomers never look at the night sky; some of them don’t even know how to find the most basic constellations. Even those of us who came to our professional calling from a teen-aged enthusiasm with small telescopes now spend most of our outdoor nights on high mountaintops: the thin atmosphere there can mean clearer images for our instruments, but it deprives our human eyes of the oxygen we need to see the stars in their full glory.

    All sorts of analogies come to mind comparing the world of astronomy with religion. We know theologians whose inability to see the living God makes them seem oxygen deprived. We’ve met the simple believer who couldn’t spell hamartiology but who knows sin when they see it. And yet, the amateur astronomers were delighted to have a few professionals among them… to enrich their enthusiasm.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    Astronomy on the Frontier http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/astronomy-on-the-frontier/ Mon, 14 Aug 2017 20:03:03 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4350 Article (blog post) 1200 words General audiences Christopher Graney writes on The Catholic Astronomer blog about the first bishop of Vincennes, Indiana, Simon Guillaume Gabriel Bruté de Rémur (1779-1839), and his library. The library contained a significant collection of works on science, which Bishop Bruté hauled all the way to the American frontier from France.  Graney writes: It turns out Bruté had been a top-notch student of science—one of the best students in his class at the medical school in Paris. So of course his library would include quite a bit of material on a variety of sciences, including astronomy. Still, Indiana was being settled at the time, and was pretty rough country: the land of Abraham Lincoln’s youth…; a land that had only become a state twenty years earlier; a land from which the Potowatami Indians were being forcibly evicted while Bruté was bishop, passing only a hundred miles to the north on a “Trail of Death.” Was it really worth the Continue reading →

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 1200 words
  • General audiences
  • Christopher Graney writes on The Catholic Astronomer blog about the first bishop of Vincennes, Indiana, Simon Guillaume Gabriel Bruté de Rémur (1779-1839), and his library. The library contained a significant collection of works on science, which Bishop Bruté hauled all the way to the American frontier from France.  Graney writes:

    It turns out Bruté had been a top-notch student of science—one of the best students in his class at the medical school in Paris. So of course his library would include quite a bit of material on a variety of sciences, including astronomy. Still, Indiana was being settled at the time, and was pretty rough country: the land of Abraham Lincoln’s youth…; a land that had only become a state twenty years earlier; a land from which the Potowatami Indians were being forcibly evicted while Bruté was bishop, passing only a hundred miles to the north on a “Trail of Death.” Was it really worth the trouble and cost to haul crates of science books to this country, all for a church library? especially for a guy who apparently owned so little other stuff of worth that a decent set of clothes had to be borrowed for his burial! Obviously, in the opinion of the first bishop of Vincennes, it was indeed worth it (and worth it to have some up-to-date astronomy books, too)…. It is worth knowing that Bishop Simon Guillaume Gabriel Bruté de Rémur cared about having science books, including astronomy books, in the rough-and-tumble country of 1830’s Indiana.  In the U.S.A., at least, we tend to value a little more those things our forebears valued.

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    November Nights Promise Wonders in the Sky! http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/november-nights-promise-wonders/ Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:44:38 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4344 Article (blog post) 800 words General audiences Fr. James Kurzynski writes on The Catholic Astronomer blog about being a diocesan priest and an amateur astronomer, and notes some of the night sky objects he finds most appealing to observe: What will you being doing this November? For me, November always provides a wonderful month to stargaze. The crisp fall evenings of western Wisconsin combined with low humidity provide a wonderful opportunity to appreciate the heavens…. There is a simple joy of looking up at the night sky at the same time every evening to see how much the moon and planets move in relation to each other and the surrounding stars…. As a Diocesan Priest, late night observation is getting harder as my work responsibilities increase and my exhaustion calls me to bed earlier and earlier. I always appreciate the opportunity to observe some fun early morning objects to feed my love of astronomy. Similar to observing the nightly movements of the Continue reading →

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  • Article (blog post)
  • 800 words
  • General audiences
  • Fr. James Kurzynski writes on The Catholic Astronomer blog about being a diocesan priest and an amateur astronomer, and notes some of the night sky objects he finds most appealing to observe:

    What will you being doing this November? For me, November always provides a wonderful month to stargaze. The crisp fall evenings of western Wisconsin combined with low humidity provide a wonderful opportunity to appreciate the heavens….

    There is a simple joy of looking up at the night sky at the same time every evening to see how much the moon and planets move in relation to each other and the surrounding stars….

    As a Diocesan Priest, late night observation is getting harder as my work responsibilities increase and my exhaustion calls me to bed earlier and earlier. I always appreciate the opportunity to observe some fun early morning objects to feed my love of astronomy. Similar to observing the nightly movements of the planets and moon, Jupiter gives us a chance to observe this gas giant in relation to the bright star Spica.

    I often try to make clear faith connections in my posts. This week, the only connection I wish to make is to encourage everyone to get out and enjoy God’s creation. If you live in a region similar to where I do, November can be a wonderful month to enjoy some stargazing amid nature’s last canvas of Fall colors. Have a great week and pray for clear skies!

    Click here to read the full article on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

     

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    Copernicus and the “High Seas” http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/copernicus-high-seas/ Sat, 12 Aug 2017 17:37:53 +0000 http://www.vofoundation.org/faith-and-science/?p=4337 Article (blog post series) 3600 words General audiences In this series of posts, written for The Catholic Astronomer blog, Christopher Graney discusses “Two Spheres Theory” regarding the shape and composition of the Earth. The Two Spheres Theory was a medieval idea that came to be taken as scientific evidence for existence of, and direct action in the world of, God. However, the Two Spheres Theory was soundly disproven by, among other things, Christopher Columbus’s voyage to the lands now known as the Americas. Click here to read Part I of this series on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation. Click here to read Part II of this series. Click here to read Part III.  

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  • Article (blog post series)
  • 3600 words
  • General audiences
  • In this series of posts, written for The Catholic Astronomer blog, Christopher Graney discusses “Two Spheres Theory” regarding the shape and composition of the Earth. The Two Spheres Theory was a medieval idea that came to be taken as scientific evidence for existence of, and direct action in the world of, God. However, the Two Spheres Theory was soundly disproven by, among other things, Christopher Columbus’s voyage to the lands now known as the Americas.

    Click here to read Part I of this series on The Catholic Astronomer – the blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

    Click here to read Part II of this series.

    Click here to read Part III.

     

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