The Great KENTUCKY Eclipse of August 21, 2017: Reading the Signs
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Two days from the eclipse and I am in Hopkinsville. Anyone passing through, even if they did not know that there was an eclipse here, would know that a Big Event is taking place. The signs are everywhere. Some of those signs are the busy-ness of landowners along Kentucky State Highway 91 into town. The path traced by the moon’s shadow will move toward the South-East into Hopkinsville, roughly following KY-91. While driving KY-91 into town earlier today, my wife and I saw lots of farms preparing for the influx of people—some setting up to welcome visitors (“Eclipse parking $50” near the point of greatest eclipse), some seeking to keep visitors from tromping all over their crops (“POSTED: No Trespassing. Private Property.”)

According to the interactive map of Xavier M. Jubier, this is the very point of maximum eclipse. When the moon’s shadow hits this field on Monday, the sun, moon, and Earth will be in as perfect alignment as they will attain during this eclipse.

According to the interactive map of Xavier M. Jubier, this is the very point of greatest eclipse. When the moon’s shadow hits this field on Monday, the sun, moon, and Earth will be in as perfect alignment as they will attain during this eclipse.

Another clear sign of a Big Event are all the streets that are closed off, and the many tents and vendors set up, right in central Hopkinsville.

There are also a lot of actual signs pertaining to the eclipse:

Hopkinsville Community College (part of the same Kentucky Community & Technical College System that my college is part of—go us!) is counting down the days. But note the chain. Ticketed guests only now—one of the few times I have ever seen a community college without its doors wide open to everyone. But, no doubt HCC is like the farmers: worried about being overrun with eclipse watchers.

Hopkinsville Community College (part of the same Kentucky Community & Technical College System that my college is part of—go us!) is counting down the days. But note the chain. Ticketed guests only now—one of the few times I have ever seen a community college without its doors wide open to everyone. But, no doubt HCC is like the farmers: worried about being overrun with eclipse watchers.

Along KY-91, following the path the moon’s shadow will take into town. Hopkinsville was also along a dark path two centuries ago—the Trail of Tears.

Along KY-91, following the path the moon’s shadow will take into town. Hopkinsville was also along a dark path two centuries ago—the Trail of Tears.

Church signs: often darkened less by the eclipse than by sun-son puns.

Church signs: often darkened less by the eclipse than by sun-son puns.

These signs are at and near Sts. Peter & Paul Catholic Church. There’s a name there all readers of this blog should recognize (left). And churches are not the only ones putting puns on signs—but you might have to know who Bonnie Tyler is get the pun (right).

These signs are at and near Sts. Peter & Paul Catholic Church. There’s a name there all readers of this blog should recognize (left). And churches are not the only ones putting puns on signs—but you might have to know who Bonnie Tyler is get the pun (right).

The big question is, what will the weather be? So far the signs in that regard are rather mixed.


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