Spacecraft 3D: NASA’s Augmented Reality Smartphone App
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NASA has an app for smartphones that lets you learn about and interact with several different spacecraft that explore our solar system, study the Earth, and observe the cosmos. You can hold a virtual Mars rover in the palm of your hand, or watch as a rocket’s boosters fall away, and its fairing separate! Seeing the Curiosity rover popup in my hand, and being able to rotate it, zoom, and deploy its mast – using my Android – just blew me away! I think students would LOVE this! If you have an iOS/Android phone,download Spacecraft 3D now and experience #AugmentedReality! https://t.co/gPQPe62z6k pic.twitter.com/8RuPfOZktS — : NASA_Eyes (@nasa_eyes) December 8, 2016 A photo target must be used for the app to generate the spacecraft model; the photo can be small enough to fit in your hand, or printed larger for use on a tabletop. The app can email you a link to the AR target (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/apps/images/3dtarget.pdf) which includes some cool Mars pics … Continue reading

Juno Close Approach to Jupiter This Saturday
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This Saturday at 5:51 a.m. PDT, (8:51 a.m. EDT, 12:51 UTC) NASA’s Juno spacecraft will get closer to the cloud tops of Jupiter than at any other time during its prime mission. At the moment of closest approach, Juno will be about 2,500 miles (4,200 kilometers) above Jupiter’s swirling clouds and traveling at 130,000 mph (208,000 kilometers per hour) with respect to the planet. There are 35 more close flybys of Jupiter scheduled during its prime mission (scheduled to end in February of 2018). The Aug. 27 flyby will be the first time Juno will have its entire suite of science instruments activated and looking at the giant planet as the spacecraft zooms past. “This is the first time we will be close to Jupiter since we entered orbit on July 4,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “Back then we turned all our instruments off to focus on the rocket … Continue reading

Jupiter Looms as Juno Approaches July 4th Arrival
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The Juno spacecraft has been in the gravitational embrace of the planet Jupiter for a month now, and is quickly approaching the moment it will ignite its thrusters, and enter into orbit over Jupiter’s poles. Juno may have some very interesting things to see, if aurorae spied by the Hubble Space Telescope in recent weeks continue to swirl around Jupiter’s north pole. Follow Juno on July 4 — Orbit Insertion Day: Noon EDT — Pre-orbit insertion briefing at JPL 10:30 p.m. EDT — Orbit insertion and NASA TV commentary begin 1:00 a.m. EDT on July 5 — Post-orbit insertion briefing at JPL Watch all of these events online, at: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv http://www.ustream.tv/nasa http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 Learn more about the Juno: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno … Continue reading

Jupiter’s Gravitational Influence now the Dominant Force on the Juno Spacecraft
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As a spacecraft nears a large celestial body, there is a point where the gravitational influence of that body becomes greater than that of any other body. Jupiter has a rather large gravitational influence, and the Juno spacecraft, still over a month away from its encounter with the giant planet, has crossed that threshold. From: JPL Press Release: 2016-136: Since its launch five years ago, there have been three forces tugging at NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it speeds through the solar system. The sun, Earth and Jupiter have all been influential — a gravitational trifecta of sorts. At times, Earth was close enough to be the frontrunner. More recently, the sun has had the most clout when it comes to Juno’s trajectory. Today, it can be reported that Jupiter is now in the gravitational driver’s seat, and the basketball court-sized spacecraft is not looking back. “Today the gravitational influence of Jupiter is neck and neck with that of the sun,” … Continue reading

NASA’s Juno Spacecraft to Explore Jupiter Starting in July
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The Juno mission as been on its way to Jupiter since its launch in August of 2011, flying by Earth in October of 2013 for a gravity assist maneuver, and will arrive at the gas giant planet on July 4, 2016 at 8:35 p.m. PDT. Juno is the first solar powered mission to Jupiter, breaking the record for the most distant solar powered spacecraft in January of 2016. Why Juno? If you want to know how stars and solar systems form, and how planets behave, you have to understand Jupiter. Humans have been studying Jupiter for hundreds of years, yet we still have major unanswered questions about this giant planet: How did Jupiter form? How is the planet arranged on the inside? Is there a solid core, and if so, how large is it? How is its vast magnetic field generated? How are atmospheric features related to the movement of the deep interior? What are the physical processes that power … Continue reading