In the Sky this Week- September 26, 2017
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Winter stars are getting higher and higher in the predawn skies; if you are an early-riser, the Orion Nebula is visible for several hours before dawn in the southern sky.

Orion high in the sky

Orion high in the southern predawn sky - Sept. 26, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

Regulus, Venus and Mars aligned in the predawn sky on Sept. 26th.

Conjunction in the eastern predawn sky - Sept. 26, 2017

Conjunction in the eastern predawn sky - Sept. 26, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The waxing crescent Moon will be very close to Saturn after sunset on the 26th; the next few days will be excellent for telescope observing.

Conjunction of the Moon and Saturn

Conjunction of the waxing crescent Moon and Saturn after sunset - Sept. 26, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The first quarter Moon will be on Sept. 27th; the Moon will still be fairly close to Saturn that evening.

First quarter moon and Saturn

First quarter moon and Saturn in the sky after sunset - Sept. 27, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The Moon will almost be full by the beginning of next week; it should be a great observing target all week long.

Waxing gibbous moon

Waxing gibbous moon in the southeastern sky - Oct. 2, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

Venus and Mars will be very close to each other in the predawn on Oct. 2nd.

Conjunction of Venus and Mars in the eastern sky

Conjunction in the eastern predawn sky -
Oct. 2, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The Double Cluster is high in the northeastern sky after sunset.

The Double Cluster is high in the sky

The Double Cluster is high in the northeastern sky after sunset - Sept. 26, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The Double Cluster (NGC 869 and NGC 884) is two open star clusters which appear close together in the constellation Perseus. Both visible to the naked eye at a dark-sky site.

The Double Cluster. Credit: Creative Commons - CC BY-SA 3.0

The large coronal hole from last week has remained, and grown in size!

The Sun's Corona shown in violet, with a huge coronal hole

The Sun's Corona - Sept. 26, 2017 - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 211 angstroms. Image courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams.

AR2673 has made the 2 week trip around the farside of the Sun, and has returned as AR2683. SpaceWeather.com says: "The formerly potent sunspot decayed while it was gone, and no longer appears to be a threat for strong flares."

The Sun's photosphere with several sunspots

The Sun - Sept. 26, 2017 - Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Image courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. / Bob Trembley.

The Solar System:

Inner Solar System, Sept. 26, 2017

Inner Solar System, Sept. 26, 2017. Credit: NASA Eyes on the Solar System / Bob Trembley.

Outer Solar System, Sept. 26, 2017

Outer Solar System, Sept. 26, 2017. Credit: NASA Eyes on the Solar System / Bob Trembley.

Apps used for this post:

Stellarium: a free open source planetarium app for PC/MAC/Linux.
NASA Eyes on the Solar System: an immersive 3D solar system and space mission app - free for the PC /MAC.


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