In the Sky this Week- September 19, 2017
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A veritable riot of conjunctions is happening all week in the eastern predawn skies; Venus is VERY close to the star Regulus, and Mercury and Mars continue to be low in the sky before sunrise.

Eastern predawn sky, Sept. 19, 2017

Eastern predawn sky, Sept. 19, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

These conjunctions can also be seen from the southern hemisphere; note how the position of the planets differs from the northern hemisphere.

Eastern predawn sky seen from Perth

Eastern predawn sky seen from Perth, Sept. 19, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

Saturn continues to be a good observing target in the southern skies after sunset.

Southwestern sky after sunset, Sept. 19, 2017

Southwestern sky after sunset, Sept. 19, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The southern skies seen from Perth after sunset are something I'd REALLY like to see; visible are the two Magellanic Clouds, the Carina Nebula

Southern sky after sunset, Sept. 19, 2017

Southern sky after sunset seen from Perth, Sept. 19, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

In the eastern sky seen from Perth at 1:00 AM on Sept. 18th we see a good example of the different orientation of constellations seen from the southern hemisphere.

Eastern sky seen from Perth at 1 AM Sept. 18, 201

Eastern sky seen from Perth at 1 AM Sept. 18, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The Pleiades star cluster can be seen high in the eastern sky at 2:00 AM.

Eastern sky at 2 AM on Sept. 19, 2017

Eastern sky at 2 AM on Sept. 19, 2017. Credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley.

The Pleiades open star cluster consists of approximately 3,000 stars, and is among the nearest star clusters to Earth; the cluster is easily visible to the naked eye.

The Pleiades open star cluster. Credit: NASA, ESA, AURA/Caltech, Palomar Observatory The science team consists of: D. Soderblom and E. Nelan (STScI), F. Benedict and B. Arthur (U. Texas), and B. Jones (Lick Obs.)

This video shows a faster-than-light trip through space to the Pleiades star cluster:

SpaceWeather.com says that "Lonely sunspot AR2680 poses no threat for strong solar flares."

The Sun's photosphere with a sunspot

The Sun - Sept. 18, 2017 - Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Image courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. / Bob Trembley.

There is a large coronal hole that can be seen in 211 angstrom s.

The Sun's Corona shown in violet

The Sun's Corona - Sept. 12, 2017 - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 211 angstrom s. Image courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams.

The Solar System:

Inner Solar System, Sept. 18, 2017

Inner Solar System, Sept. 18, 2017. Credit: NASA Eyes on the Solar System / Bob Trembley.

Full Solar System, Sept. 18, 2017

Full Solar System, Sept. 18, 2017. Credit: NASA Eyes on the Solar System / Bob Trembley.

Apps used for this post:

Stellarium: a free open source planetarium app for PC/MAC/Linux.
NASA Eyes on the Solar System: an immersive 3D solar system and space mission app - free for the PC /MAC.


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