In the Sky This Week – July 11, 2017
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Venus Aldebaran Conjunction July 10-18 2017

Venus-Aldebaran Conjunction July 10-18, 2017 5:00 AM. Image credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley

Venus continues to be the "morning star" in the east, and will appear very close to the red giant star Aldebaran - the "eye of the bull" in the constellation Taurus. On the 11th, Venus will be 3 north of Aldebaran, over the course of the week, Venus' day to day change in position relative to Aldebaran will be very noticeable.

Vega and Altair at Dawn - July 12, 2017

Vega and Altair Fading with the Dawn - July 12, 2017 5:45 AM. Image credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley

In the west, bright stars Vega and Altair are the last to fade in the oncoming dawn.

On the 11th, a waning gibbous Moon will be rise in the east before midnight, and set in the west around 9:00 AM. On the 18th, a waning crescent Moon will rise shortly after 2:00 AM, and be visible until it is lost in the glare of the rising sun after 6:00 AM. The Moon will be at third quarter on the 16th, and will be visible from about 1:00 AM - 1:00 PM.*

Southern Sky - July 11, 2017

Southern Sky - July 11, 2017 11:00 PM. Image credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley

Jupiter and Saturn are visible in the southern sky after sunset; Jupiter sets shortly after midnight, and Saturn sets around 3:30 AM.

Northern Sky - July 11, 2017

Northern Sky - July 11, 2017 11:00 PM. Image credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley

The constellation Cassiopeia, recognizable as a "big W," appears low on the horizon to the north shortly after sunset.

The Sky Overhead - July 11, 2017

The Sky Overhead - July 11, 2017 11:00 PM. Image credit: Stellarium / Bob Trembley

The Solar System - July 10, 2017

The Solar System - July 10, 2017. Image credit: NASA Eyes on the Solar System / Bob Trembley

* I was once asked by a very well educated adult relative: "Why can I see the Moon during the day?" The Moon orbits around the Earth - that orbit takes the Moon around both the sunlit and nighttime sides of the Earth. A new Moon, being "in front of the Earth" is lost in the glare of the Sun; first and third quarter Moons can be seen during both day and nighttime hours. The full Moon, being "behind the Earth" is visible from dusk to dawn.

Apps used for this post:

Stellarium: a free open source planetarium app for PC/MAC/Linux.
NASA Eyes on the Solar System: an immersive 3D solar system and space mission app - free for the PC /MAC.

Also in In the Sky This Week

Weekly post on what you can see in the sky.

  1. In the Sky This Week – June 22, 2017
  2. In the Sky This Week – June 27, 2017
  3. In the Sky This Week – July 4, 2017
  4. In the Sky This Week – July 11, 2017
  5. What’s in the Sky July 18, 2017

View the entire series


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